Jean-louis Dessalles - Online papers

[<See all papers] - [See Books] - [See Selected Papers] - [See Talks]

Keys

SIMPLICITY:Simplicity Theory
EVOL.&LANG.:Evolutionary origins of language and of cognition
NARRATIVE:Cognitive modelling of interest in conversational narratives
ARGUMENTATION:Cognitive modelling of relevance in argumentative discussions
MEANING:Cognitive modelling of meaning
CONVERSATION:Cognitive modelling of spontaneous conversation
EMOTION:Cognitive modelling of emotional intensity
LEARNING:Cognitive modelling of concept learning
CONSCIOUSNESS:Qualia cannot be epiphenomenal (but the expl. gap is intact)
EMERGENCE:Emergence as complexity drop
EVOL.&INFORM.:Evolution and information

Selected topic: Cognitive modelling of interest in conversational narratives


Between 25% and 40% of conversation time is devoted to narratives. I developed a model of narrative relevance, based on cognitive simplicity.
Interesting topics correspond to a cognitive complexity drop. Complexity drop predicts how much a topic will appear unexpected. Emotional intensity is also an essential ingredient of interestingness that is controlled by complexity drop as well.

Modelling interest in narratives led me to develop Simplicity Theory.

My 16 papers about NARRATIVE (but see my other papers)

  1. Saillenfest, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2014). Can Believable Characters Act Unexpectedly? Literary & Linguistic Computing, 29 (4), 606-620.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE SIMPLICITY
    Unexpectedness is a major factor controlling interest in narratives. Emotions, for instance, are felt intensely if they are associated with unexpected events. The problem with generating unexpected situations is that either characters, or the whole story, are at risk of being no longer believable. This issue is one of the main problems that make story design a hard task. Writers face it on a case by case basis. The automatic generation of interesting stories requires formal criteria to decide to what extent a given situation is unexpected and to what extent actions are kept believable. This paper proposes such formal criteria and makes suggestions concerning their use in story generation systems.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  2. Saillenfest, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2014). A cognitive approach to narrative planning with believable characters. In M. A. Finlayson, J. C. Meister & E. G. Bruneau (Eds.), 2014 Workshop on Computational Models of Narrative - OASIcs vol. 41, 177-181. Dagstuhl, Germany: .
    Keywords: NARRATIVE
    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  3. Dessalles, J.-L. (2013). Algorithmic simplicity and relevance. In D. L. Dowe (Ed.), Algorithmic probability and friends - LNAI 7070, 119-130. Berlin, D: Springer Verlag.
    Keywords: SIMPLICITY NARRATIVE
    The human mind is known to be sensitive to complexity. For instance, the visual system reconstructs hidden parts of objects following a principle of maximum simplicity. We suggest here that higher cognitive processes, such as the selection of relevant situations, are sensitive to variations of complexity. Situations are relevant to human beings when they appear simpler to describe than to generate. This definition offers a predictive (i.e. refutable) model for the selection of situations worth reporting (interestingness) and for what individuals consider an appropriate move in conversation.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  4. Saillenfest, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2013). Using unexpected simplicity to control moral judgments and interest in narratives. In M. A. Finlayson, B. Fisseni, B. Löwe & J. C. Meister (Eds.), 2013 Workshop on Computational Models of Narrative - OASIcs vol. 32, 214-227. Saarbrücken, Germany: .
    Keywords: NARRATIVE SIMPLICITY
    The challenge of narrative automatic generation is to produce not only coherent, but interesting stories. This study considers the problem within the Simplicity Theory framework. According to this theory, interesting situations must be unexpectedly simple, either because they should have required complex circumstances to be produced, or because they are abnormally simple, as in coincidences. Here we consider the special case of narratives in which characters perform actions with emotional consequences. We show, using the simplicity framework, how notions such as intentions, believability, responsibility and moral judgments are linked to narrative interest.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  5. Saillenfest, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2012). Role of kolmogorov complexity on interest in moral dilemma stories. In N. Miyake, D. Peebles & R. Cooper (Eds.), Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 947-952. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE SIMPLICITY
    Several studies have highlighted the combined role of emotions and reasoning in the determination of judgments about morality. Here we explore the influence of Kolmogorov complexity in the determination, not only of moral judgment, but also of the associated narrative interest. We designed an experiment to test the predictions of our complexity-based model when applied to moral dilemmas. It confirms that judgments about interest and morality may be explained in part by discrepancies in complexity. This preliminary study suggests that cognitive computations are involved in decision-making about emotional outcomes.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  6. Dessalles, J.-L. (2011). Parler pour exister. Sciences humaines, 224, 45-47.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE EVOL.&LANG.
    Le langage ne vise pas seulement à transmettre des informations utiles. Il sert aussi à se mettre en valeur en racontant de bonnes histoires qui doivent répondre à des caractéristiques très précises.

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  7. Dimulescu, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2009). Prédire l'intérêt dans la communication événementielle. In N. Maudet, P.-Y. Schobbens & M. Guyomard (Eds.), Modèles formels de l'interaction (MFI-09) - Actes des cinquièmes journées francophones, 125-134. Lannion: .
    Keywords: NARRATIVE SIMPLICITY
    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  8. Dimulescu, A. & Dessalles, J.-L. (2009). Understanding narrative interest: Some evidence on the role of unexpectedness. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (Eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 1734-1739. Amsterdam, NL: Cognitive Science Society.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE SIMPLICITY
    This study is an attempt to measure the variations of interest aroused by conversational narratives when definite dimensions of the reported events are manipulated. The results are compared with the predictions of the Complexity Drop Theory, which states that events are more interesting when they appear simpler, in the Kolmogorov sense, than anticipated.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  9. Dessalles, J.-L. (2009). Où est mon information ? Telecom, 154, 57-60.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE
    Le prix de certaines informations est devenu négatif : nous sommes prêts à payer pour ne pas recevoir la plupart des messages qui assaillent nos boîtes électroniques. À l'inverse, le coût de l'information pertinente, ou le temps nécessaire pour la trouver, risque d'augmenter indéfiniment. Pourrons-nous échapper à cette malédiction ?

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  10. Dessalles, J.-L. (2008). Spontaneous narrative behaviour in homo sapiens: how does it benefit to speakers? In A. D. M. Smith, K. Smith & R. Ferrer i Cancho (Eds.), The evolution of language - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference (Evolang7 - Barcelona), 91-98. Singapore: World Scientific.
    Keywords: EVOL.&LANG. NARRATIVE
    The fact that human beings universally put much energy and conviction in reporting events in daily conversations demands an explanation. After having observed that the selection of reportable events is based on unexpectedness and emotion, we make a few suggestions to show how the existence of narrative behaviour can be consistent with the socio-political theory of the origin of language.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  11. Dessalles, J.-L. (2007). Storing events to retell them (Commentary on Suddendorf and Corballis: 'The evolution of foresight'). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30 (3), 321-322.
    Keywords: EVOL.&LANG. NARRATIVE
    Episodic memory is certainly a unique endowment, but its primary purpose is something other than to provide raw material for creative synthesis of future scenarios. Remembered episodes are exactly those which are worth telling. The function of episodic memory, in our view, is to accumulate stories that are relevant to recount in conversation.

    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  12. Dessalles, J.-L. (2007). Complexité cognitive appliquée à la modélisation de l'intérêt narratif. Intellectica, 45 (1), 145-165.
    Keywords: SIMPLICITY NARRATIVE
    Nous définissons la complexité cognitive comme une notion dérivée de la complexité de Kolmogorov. Nous montrons qu'une partie importante de ce qui retient l'intérêt des êtres humains, notamment lors de la sélection des événements spontanément signalés ou rapportés, peut être prédite par un saut de complexité cognitive. Nous évaluons les conséquences de ce modèle pour l'étude de la pertinence conversationnelle.

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  13. Dessalles, J.-L. (2006). Intérêt conversationnel et complexité : le rôle de l'inattendu dans la communication spontanée. Psychologie de l'Interaction, , 259-281.
    Keywords: SIMPLICITY NARRATIVE
    La conversation humaine agit comme un filtre extraordinairement sélectif : seule une infime partie des situations que les locuteurs ont vécues ou ont pu connaître sera jugée digne d'être rapportée aux interlocuteurs. L'un des objectifs de la recherche sur le langage consiste à rechercher des critères permettant de prévoir si une situation sera perçue comme suffisamment « intéressante » si elle est mentionnée en conversation. Nous montrons ici que le caractère inattendu de certaines situations, qui conduit souvent à ce qu'elles soient rapportées en conversation, est lié à des écarts de complexité, et que ce phénomène peut s'expliquer dans le cadre plus général de la théorie « shannonienne » de la communication événementielle.

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  14. Dessalles, J.-L. (2006). Trivialization behaviour in conversation. Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Language, Culture and Mind, 44-46. Paris: Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE CONVERSATION
    Download a PDF version of this paper     BibTeX
  15. Dessalles, J.-L. (2005). Vers une modélisation de l'intérêt. In A. Herzig, Y. Lespérance & A.-I. Mouaddib (Eds.), Actes des troisièmes journées francophones 'Modèles formels de l'interaction' (MFI-05), 113-122. Toulouse: Cépaduès Editions.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE CONVERSATION
    Un aspect important des interactions humaines est lié au fait que les individus exigent les uns des autres que leurs messages apparaissent comme intéressants, les autres messages étant perçus comme inutiles, gênants, voire ineptes. Nous proposons ici un modèle de l'intérêt, for-mé à partir de l'observation des conversations spontanées. Nous vérifions que de fortes contraintes portent sur le contenu des messages admissibles. Nous identifions en particulier une classe de messages "inté-ressants" ignorée des modèles habituels : les messages portant sur un état de fait improbable, que nous analy-sons comme associés à une valeur informationnelle élevée. Les applications potentielles de ce modèle vont de la sélection automatique des informations à l'interaction humain-machine

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX
  16. Dessalles, J.-L. (2002). La fonction shannonienne du langage : un indice de son évolution. Langages, 36 (146), 101-111.
    Keywords: NARRATIVE
    La raison première pour laquelle le comportement de langage existe dans notre espèce est à rechercher dans l'utilisation que nous en faisons et dans l'impact biologique que cette utilisation peut avoir sur la survie et la reproduction des individus. Nous analysons l'une de ces utilisations, que nous qualifions de shannonienne et qui consiste à attirer systématiquement l'attention sur les nouveautés. Nous suggérons que l'emploi shannonien du langage est révélateur de son utilisation première et constituait même la raison d'être de ce qu'il est convenu d'appeler le protolangage.

    Télécharger une version PDF de cet article     BibTeX

horizStrip


    J-L Dessalles:     Complete list of publications
    J-L Dessalles:     Home Page

    Contact: