Job under my supervision

Opened positions

How to apply for a job: General rules

I receive many CVs of persons who would like to work in our research team. Here are a few rules to respect if you want me to give you an answer.
  • Your application should mention whether you need my lab to cover your expenses, including travel expenses, or whether you already have a scholarship. If you have a scholarship, that may not be enough for you to live in Sophia-Antipolis (France), so, give me the amount of your scholarship.

  • Do not send me any word-like CVs or documents. I don't have any Microsoft stuffs installed on my computer. Do prefer files in pdf format. Also, if you are to send me several files, do make a zip/targz before sending them to me.

  • Clearly state to which job offer you are referring too. If you are not referring to a given job offer, do state it as well.

  • You CV should be clear about domains in which you are an expert, in which you have some good skills. For example, if you put in your skills "Linux" (BTW: you should say GNU/Linux), I expect you to know what are the scheduling policies implemented in the Linux kernel, how virtual memory is handled, what are system calls and how they are handled by the Linux kernel, how are handled shared libraries, etc. This remark obviously applies to other skills: C, UML, Windows, etc.

  • Being excellent in at least one programming language (C, Java, Python) is mandatory to work in our lab.

  • Do provide your most recent grades, if possible with the ranking information.

  • You should be able to speak English, to read scientific papers written in English, and to write documents in English.

Internships: How to apply

  • Start the subject of your email with: [Application for an internship: ]. If there is no reference, just leave the reference empty.

  • I do not accept internships whose duration is less than 5 months. Don't waste time telling me that you are a genius and that even in two months, you can do plenty of interesting stuff.

  • Clearly state why you are interested to work in our lab. Do not say: "Your lab is well-known, blah blah blah", but clearly refer to projects of the lab in which you would like to be involved in, and why you would like to be involved in them. You can provide a cover letter to explain this, but you can also simply explain this in an email.

  • Before accepting you as an intern, you will go through technical tests according to what you state in your CV. Typically, if you state that you can program in C, I will ask you to make a program with variable and function pointers manipulation. Similarly, if you state that you can program in Java, I will typically ask you what the "synchronized" and "static" keywords mean, how to parse a linked list efficiently, and how Java threads are scheduled by the Java Virtual Machine.

Ph.Ds.: How to apply

  • Start the subject of your email with: [Application for a Ph.D.: ]. If there is no reference, just leave the reference empty.

  • Clearly state why you would like to make a Ph.D. in our lab. Do not say: "Your lab is well-known, blah blah blah", but clearly mention what are the research fields studied in our lab for which you have a strong interest. A good way to do is probably to read a few publications we have recently published, and say why they are in a domain of your interest.

  • Before being accepted as a Ph.D. student, you will go through a technical interview (e.g., depending of the Ph.D. topic, your skills in C, GNU/Linux, UML, system security, hardware design, etc.), and you will be asked to review a recent research paper.

  • You should be able to speak English, to read scientific papers written in English, and to write documents in English.